Sunday, April 23, 2017

The Hate U Give - Angie Thomas

Title: The Hate U Give
Author: Angie Thomas
Publisher: Balzer + Bray (HarperCollins), 2017 (Hardcover)
Length: 444 pages
Genre: Young Adult; Realistic Fiction
Started: April 19, 2017
Finished: April 23, 2017

Summary:
From the inside cover:

Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor black neighbourhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend, Khalil, at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.

Soon afterward, Khalil's death is a national headline. Some are calling him a a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gang banger. Starr's best friend at school suggests he may have had it coming. When it becomes clear the police have little interest in investigating the incident, protestors take to the streets and Starr's neighbourhood becomes a war zone. What everyone wants to know is: What really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.

But what Starr does - or does not - say could destroy her community. It could also endanger her life.

Angie Thomas' searing debut about an ordinary girl in extraordinary circumstances addresses issues of racism and police violence with intelligence, heart, and unflinching honesty.

Review:
This book had so much hype leading up to its release, but unlike other books that receive similar pre-publication buzz, I had a feeling this book would completely live up to it. I wasn't wrong. This book is completely deserving of all the accolades it receives and more. I was recommending it to my students last week while I was reading it.

I am so happy that this book exists. This story is not only timely, but also incredibly powerful.

I also think everyone (yes, everyone) should read this book. Especially if you're white or otherwise privileged. Yes, I went there.

When Starr was ten, she witnessed her friend Natasha's murder during a drive-by shooting. That was the impetus for her mother Lisa and father Maverick to send all three of their children to a suburban school an hour away in her Uncle Carlos' neighbourhood, not only for a better education, but for a safer environment. Starr, and her brothers Seven and Sekani, learn to forever switch between two personas: their more polished, well-spoken selves they present at school, and their more relaxed authentic selves when at home in Garden Heights. Starr hates that she needs to do this, but she knows if she slips up at school, she'll be seen as the poor scholarship student from the ghetto who doesn't know how to act properly. Not only that, she'll jeopardize her relationships with her white friends and boyfriend and her chance at a better future that her parents worked so hard to obtain.

Amidst all this, Starr witnesses her childhood friend Khalil's murder at the hands of a cop. Not only does Starr have to testify to the police and the DA, but she also tries to hold things together at school, vowing not to let on that the "witness" mentioned in the case that's now made national headlines is actually her. The media and the offending police officer makes Khalil out to be a thug and a drug dealer (and all the kids at her school believe it), but Starr knows the whole story behind who Khalil really was, and is determined to not let his voice be forever silenced.

This book shows readers a type of life some of us can't even imagine. Whereas some children are taught that police officers are ones to seek out if they need help, Starr and her brothers are taught to not make any sudden movements in the presence of police and to keep their hands visible at all times.  Where some kids are made to recite religious creeds or prayers, Starr and her brothers are raised on the Black Panther's Ten-Point Program. There's actually a really touching scene in the book where Maverick makes Starr repeat a few of the relevant points when she wants to back out of testifying due to threats made against her family. A lot of people out there have trouble understanding what white privilege really is; this book is like a crash course in it (Maverick's conversation with Starr on pages 167-171 sums it up nicely).

The author not only manages to make an authentic, honest novel based on the Black Lives Matter movement, she also doesn't make it preachy. She subtly weaves threads of community and family together till readers realize that this is the other side of the news stories. You don't see the guilt the survivors feel. You don't see the lack of choices that led people to their present actions. You don't see the nightmares. You don't feel the fear of the riots right outside your house. You don't feel the slight of racist comments that people shrug off as a joke. You don't have to watch your every word and movement for fear you won't be taken seriously otherwise. This book reminds me why we make kids read books to begin with: not just to learn, but to gain new perspectives and empathy.

Starr is an incredible character. She's a realistic teenager thrust into circumstances most of us can't even fathom, and even though she's scared out of her mind, with the support of her family she does the right thing for herself and those around her. All the secondary characters were nicely developed as well; I loved Seven and his unique situation and the perspective he brings to Starr's family, and Chris was nicely written as well as he tries to really understand Starr's perspective. I adored the family portrayal, it was incredibly loving and realistic. Lisa and Maverick fight, but they resolve conflict in healthy ways and still love each other to death. There's a scene where Starr calls them her OTP and says she looks to them as a role model for what she wants in relationships (that's right parents, the kids are watching us). Starr's parents know their kids and what they need, and ultimately make some hard decisions that conflict with what they initially want for themselves.

The book is bittersweet, mixing serious tragedy with humour (like the numerous Fresh Prince references) and ends on a realistic yet hopeful note. In terms of the writing style, I'm not sure if I imagined this, but the writing subtly changes when Starr is in Garden Heights versus at school in the suburbs, it was a nice reinforcement to the dual persona idea that Starr grapples with.

Recommendation:
Everyone needs to read this. I'll even go so far as to say this should be required reading (heck, we can use it to complement To Kill a Mockingbird in terms of themes). Just go read this, you won't be disappointed.

Thoughts on the cover:
I love the simple white background with Starr front and centre (I love the detail on her shoes, nice touch from the book). The title font is written in such a way that it spells out THUG, which of course references Tupac Shakur/2Pac nicely.

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Giant Days - John Allison, Lissa Treiman, and Whitney Cogar

Title: Giant Days Volume 1
Author: John Allison, Lissa Treiman, and Whitney Cogar
Publisher: Boom! Box, 2016 (Paperback)
Length: 128 pages
Genre: Young Adult/Adult; Realistic Fiction, Graphic Novel
Started: April 18, 2017
Finished: April 18, 2017

Summary:
From the back cover:

Susan, Esther, and Daisy started university three weeks ago and became fast friends. Now, away from home for the first time, all three want to reinvent themselves. But in the face of hand-wringing boys, "personal experimentation," influenza, mystery-mold, nu-chauvinism, and the willful, unwanted intrusion of "academia," they may be lucky just to make it to spring alive. Going off to university is always a time of change and growth, but for Esther, Susan, and Daisy, things are about to get a little weird.

Review:
This is by the same publishing company that releases Lumberjanes, so I'll be honest, I picked this up on that fact alone. And I wasn't disappointed.

Esther is a goth with a sarcastic sense of humour, Daisy is a sheltered girl who was previously homeschooled, and Susan is a bit jaded. All three are first-years at a university in Britain and get along swimmingly. The girls weather their first away-from-home encounters with being sick, dealing with chauvinistic boys, when pieces of the past come back to haunt them, and just navigating university life. Like Lumberjanes this series has a similar sense of humour, diversity in many areas, and passes the Bechdel Test (yay for female presence in comics!).

Recommendation:
Definitely worth a read if you're a fan of Lumberjanes or any of the other Boom! Box titles.

Thoughts on the cover:
I like this candid shot of Esther, especially against the yellow background.

Monday, April 17, 2017

The Beast Is an Animal - Peternelle van Arsdale

Title: The Beast Is an Animal
Author: Peternelle van Arsdale
Publisher: Margaret K. McElderry Books, 2017 (Hardcover)
Length: 343 pages
Genre: Young Adult; Fantasy, Fairy Tale
Started: April 1, 2017
Finished: April 16, 2017

Summary:
From the inside cover:

The Beast is an animal
You'd better lock the Gate
Or when it's dark, It comes for you
Then it will be too late

The Beast is an animal
Hear It scratch upon your door
It sucks your soul then licks the bowl
And sniffs around for more

The Beast is an animal
It has a pointy chin
It eats you while you slept night
Leaves nothing but your skin

Alys was seven the first time she saw the soul eaters. Twin sisters, they radiated an energy that excited Alys. Through them she felt the wilderness of the fforest, and The Beast within it. Too late, she learned of their power to destroy.

By the time she is fifteen, Alys knows too much about both the lure and the danger of the soul eaters. She lives in a world of adults who are terrified of their power, and who cower behind high walls and grim rules. Fear of the soul eaters - and of The Beast- rules their lives. Even more, they fear the ways in which The Beast may lurk among them - and within a girl like Alys.

For Alys has a connection to the soul eaters, and The Beast. And she hides a truth about herself that she can reveal to no one, for fear she will be called a witch. As the threat posed by the soul eaters grows, Alys must undertake a journey through the wild danger of the fforest. But the greatest danger is not outside her. Alys' secret about who - and what - she is terrifies her most of all. And in order to save her world, she must also risk losing herself.

The Beast Is an Animal is an eerie, compelling, wholly original tale of far-flung villages, dark woods, and creatures that hunt in the night. It is also a deeply human story about a girl finding her way in a world that is ugly and beautiful, good and bad - and discovering the same within herself.

Review:
This is a strange book, but a very good one.

Alys' village is attacked by the soul eaters when she is seven years old, leaving alive only children under the age of sixteen (the author gives a backstory to the soul eaters early on, but I'm classifying it as spoiler territory so I won't reveal it here). With no one to take care of them, the children of Gwenith are taken in by the puritanical inhabitants of Defaid who view the tragedy in the nearby village as a warning not to stray from the path of righteousness. Defaid builds a wall around itself to both keep the soul eaters out and to closely observe the behaviour of its citizens. As Alys grows she learns to keep certain things to herself, like the encounters she's had with the soul eaters and The Beast, lest she be labeled a witch and killed or banished into the fforest (and yes it is intentionally spelled that way). As the situation worsens, Alys is charged with remedying things before they degrade further still, but not before she must escape Defaid for fear of her own life.

I have to give the author credit for creating a seemingly simple book that packs a punch in terms of allegory. The writing here is simple but highly evocative, bordering on magical realism. The underlying messages here are fairly easy to uncover but nonetheless important: that humanity is a mix of both good and evil (no one can claim to be purely angelic or devilish), and that the stories we tell about ourselves, and others, shape who we become. I especially love how The Beast is described with  a capital "I" like how we ascribe to God, it just reinforces the former point all the more.

Recommendation:
If you want to read something different, yet wholly satisfying that will leave you pondering, then read this. I'll definitely be adding this to my library at home.

Thoughts on the cover:
It is eerie and creepy and fits the feel of the novel oh so well. The tree-figure in the centre fits exactly with how the soul eaters are described.

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Long May She Reign - Rhiannon Thomas

Title: Long May She Reign
Author: Rhiannon Thomas
Publisher: HarperTeen, 2017 (Hardcover)
Length: 422 pages
Genre: Young Adult; Fantasy
Started: March 23, 2017
Finished: March 30, 2017

Summary:
From the inside cover:

Freya was never meant to be queen.

Twenty-third in line to the throne, she never dreamed of a life in the palace, and would much rather research in her laboratory than participate in the intrigues of the court. However, when an extravagant banquet turns deadly and the king and those closest to him are poisoned, Freya suddenly finds herself on the throne.

She may have  escaped from the massacre, but she is far from safe. The nobles don't respect her, her councillors want to control her, and with the mystery of who killed the king still unsolved, she knows that a single mistake could cost her the kingdom - and her life.

Freya is determined to survive, and that means uncovering the murderers herself. Until then, she can't trust anyone. Not her advisers. Not the king's dashing and enigmatic illegitimate son. Not even her own father, who always wanted the best for her but also wanted more power for himself.

As Freya's enemies close in and her loyalties are tested, she must decide of she is ready to rule and, if so, how far she is willing to go to keep the crown.

Review:
There's some hype surrounding this book, so it was a given that I'd pick it up. Plus, how could I turn down a book with a heroine that shares a name with my dog?

Freya, the daughter of a noble mother and a merchant father, is an anxious and intelligent girl who would rather conduct experiments in her laboratory than sit through the lavish and pretentious parties the king throws for his court. On the night of the king's birthday celebration, Freya and her friend Naomi leave early to test out Freya's idea of a portable heat source, As they work into the morning, they discover that practically everyone who had attended the party with them, the majority of the nobility in all of Epria, has been killed from arsenic poisoning. With the king and his heirs before her now dead, Freya automatically becomes queen, the very thing she never wanted. Of the court members that survive, some suspect her, some despise her, and most think very little of her. Unsure of whom she can trust, Freya decides to solve the mystery of the massacre herself; while at the same time trying to learn to be a better ruler than the king before her, and defending against an invasion from those that want her dead.

This story has great potential and there were many things I quite liked, but unfortunately it didn't quite deliver. I loved Freya and her characterization, that she is more logical and loves science but also has social anxiety issues. She has a strong sense of her own moral code and sticks to it regardless of the influence of others, and I admire that in a character. Once she knows the ropes and how things work at court, she is confident in her choices and exercises her power as queen to bring about positive social change. The book had a big focus on female friendships, which I also enjoyed (yay for books passing what I imagine is the book equivalent of the Bechtel test). However, there were a few things that didn't really fit. The fact that even though Freya has a legion of people against her (Torsten Wolff and his supporters), she manages to dissuade them and succeed by playing on the idea that she was chosen by the Forgotten, it was just way too easy. Also, Freya just happens to find amazingly supportive people to help her without any betrayal or typical back-stabbing (not counting the twist at the end)? Again, way too easy. There was conflict mind you, but it was so easily resolved. Fitzroy's character was your typical clown who plays everything for a joke but in reality just masks the kinder persona beneath it, which I feel is something I've seen before and would've liked to see him a bit more developed. Freya's social anxieties seem to disappear halfway into the book, so there's that as well. And although the murder mystery aspect was quite well-constructed and interesting overall, the end result just wasn't all that realistic (can't elaborate due to spoilers). There was also no real world-building, which is disappointing since I quite enjoy learning about a novel's universe and how things work in it.

Recommendation:
This is an enjoyable read overall, but won't be a jaw-dropping favourite due to the above issues. Oh, but there's also a quirky lab cat, so that gives it a few more points in my book.

Thoughts on the cover:
I really enjoy the fortress/prison in the beaker bottle, it's a very unique image that works well for the tone of the book.

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Heart's Blood - Juliet Marillier

Title: Heart's Blood
Author: Juliet Marillier
Publisher: Roc, 2009 (Hardcover)
Length: 402 pages
Genre: Adult; Fantasy, Fairy Tale
Started: March 20, 2017
Finished: March 22, 2017

Summary:
From the inside cover:

Whistling Tor is a place of secrets, a mysterious wooded hill housing the crumbling fortress of a chieftain whose name is spoken throughout the region in tones of revulsion and bitterness. A curse lies over Anluan's family and his people. The woods hold a perilous force whose every whisper threatens doom. And Anluan himself has been crippled by a childhood illness.

Then the young scribe Caitrin appears in Anluan's garden, admiring the rare plant known as heart's blood. Retained to sort through entangled family documents, Caitrin brings about unexpected changes in the household, casting a hopeful light against the despairing shadows.

But even as Caitrin brings solace to Anluan, and the promise of something more between them, he remains in thrall to the darkness surrounding Whistling Tor. To free Anluan's burdened soul, Caitrin must unravel the web or sorcery woven by his ancestors before it claims his life - and their love.

Review:
I'm on a Beauty and the Beast kick currently, so when I looked up a list of books inspired by the original tale and this one came up, I knew I had my next read.

In a world resembling medieval Ireland (cue the numerous Google searches on how to pronounce all the characters' names), Caitrin is a scribe who is escaping her abusive relatives after the death of her father. When she comes upon Whistling Tor and finds out the chieftain of the area is looking for the services of a scribe trained in Latin, Caitrin jumps at the chance for safety and security despite the stories in the settlement that the chieftain's family is cursed, and that supernatural beings haunt the hill. Anluan is the crippled leader of Whistling Tor, whose family curse originated with his great-grandfather Nechtan a hundred years prior. When Caitrin is hired to translate Nechtan's personal documents from Latin to Irish, she learns, both through the documents and experience, that the supernatural beings in the woods are actually an army of undead spirits: those who were once human but lingered in a purgatory-like existence after death due to some unfortunate error they committed and who are bound to whomever is the current chieftain at Whistling Tor. Anluan can command this army, collectively called the host, but it severely weakens him because he must constantly suppress the evil urges that sometimes overcome them. Detested by the folk of the settlement and angry over his handicap, Anluan is an awkward and self-loathing man that, despite his rough manners, Caitrin comes to admire due the loyalty he inspires from those in his household. After she is saved by Anluan and the host when her kinsman, Cillian, tries to bring her back home, Caitrin is determined to find some way to end the curse and set the host free. Throw in an invasion by the Normans and you've got an intriguing plot that is quite involving (at leastuntil the reader figures everything out).

What makes this retelling so superb is partly the writing style; the author does tend to be verbose, but I appreciated it since it added to the atmosphere. She is so skilled at not only crafting an engaging story that uniquely stands on its own despite borrowing elements from the Beauty and the Beast tale (enchanted castle, special flower, magic mirrors, Beauty's literacy and love of books), but by creating such realistic characters and a genuinely creepy environment that will send shivers down your back. Caitrin and Anluan are deeply flawed, realistic characters: Caitrin detests the frightened person she became under her abusive family, and Anluan believes he is less of a man and a leader not only because of his affected body, but because his control over the host does not allow him to leave the hill, leading to strained relationships with the folk in the settlement below. Caitrin is optimistically hopeful, which leads both her and Anluan to believe that with courage and determination they can improve their lot in life. I have to give the author credit for including the magic in the mirrors, it was a great way to experience a different point of view, plus it was just deliciously creepy and unsettling.

Recommendation:
An excellent read with a wonderful story, well-crafted romance, and lovely characters (I loved all the secondary characters as much as I loved the mains).

Thoughts on the cover:
It's kind of meh, but I can't quite figure out why.

Thursday, March 9, 2017

A Hope More Powerful Than the Sea: The Journey of Doaa Al Zamel - Melissa Fleming

Title: A Hope More Powerful Than the Sea: The Journey of Doaa Al Zamel
Author: Melissa Fleming
Publisher: Flatiron Books, 2017 (Hardcover)
Length: 274 pages
Genre: Adult/Young Adult; Nonfiction
Started: March 8, 2017
Finished: March 8, 2017

Summary:
From the inside cover:

The stunning story of a young woman, an international crisis, and the triumph of the human spirit.

Adrift in a frigid sea, no land in sight - just debris from the ship's wreckage and floating corpses all around - nineteen-year-old Doaa Al Zamel floats with a small inflatable water ring around her waist and clutches two small children, barely toddlers, to her body. The children has been thrust into Doaa's arms by their drowning relatives, all refugees who boarded a dangerously overcrowded ship bound for Sweden and a new life. For days, Doaa floats, prays, and sings to the babies in her arms. She must stay alive for these children. She must not lose hope.

Doaa Al Zamel was once an average Syrian girl growing up in a crowded house in a bustling city near the Jordanian border. But in 2011, her life was upended. Inspired by the events of the Arab Spring, Syrians began to stand up against their own oppressive regime. When the army was sent to take control of of Doaa's hometown. strict curfews, power outages. water shortages, air raids, and violence disrupted everyday life. After Doaa's father's barbershop was destroyed and rumours of women being abducted spread through the community, her family decided to leave Syria for Egypt, where they hoped to stay in peace until they could return home. Only months after their arrival, the Egyptian government was overthrown and the environment turned hostile for refugees.

In the midst of this chaos, Doaa falls in love with a young opposition fighter who proposes marriage and convinces her to flee to the promise of safety and a better future in Europe. Terrified and unable to swim, Doaa and her young fiancee hand their life savings to smugglers and board a dilapidated fishing vessel with five hundred other refugees, including a hundred children. After four horrifying days at sea, another ship, filled with angry men shouting insults, rams into Doaa's boat, sinking it and leaving the passengers to drown.

That is where Doaa's struggle for survival really begins.

This emotionally charged, eye-opening true story represents the millions of unheard voices of refugees who risk everything in a desperate search for the promise of a safe future. Melissa Fleming sheds light on the most pressing humanitarian crisis of our time and paints a vivid, unforgettable portrait of the triumph of the human spirit.

Review:
There's been some hype surrounding this book, calling it "required reading." In my experience, if people throw that phrase around, there's usually a good reason, so I picked this up. It wasn't until after I'd started reading that I realized I'd encountered this story before; the author had given a TED Talk on the Syrian refugee crisis that I'd watched, and Doaa's story of surviving the aftermath of the sinking had been the focus.

The book opens with Doaa's childhood in Daraa, Syria, outlining Doaa's family dynamics and the events of her early years. It moves on to document the events of the Arab Spring-inspired protests in Daraa that Doaa participates in after the arrest and torture of a group of young boys in February 2011, and the stark decline of living conditions and the increase in violence in the months to follow. When Doaa's father Shokri fears for the safety of his daughters, the family seeks asylum in Egypt in late 2012. Though the family is initially welcomed in Egypt and they are soon able to have some semblance of the life they left behind, the Egyptian government under Morsi was overthrown in July 2013, which lead to hostile treatment of Syrian refugees almost overnight. Amidst all this, a man named Bassem, a fellow Syrian refugee in Egypt, falls in love with Doaa. She eventually accepts his proposal, and the two become engaged. After tensions lead to Doaa's younger siblings to be threatened at school, the young couple know they cannot remain in Egypt, so they make plans to leave for Europe in the only way available to them: illegal smuggling. After several failed attempts, Doaa and Bassem find themselves aboard a fishing vessel with five hundred other refugees in September 2014 headed for Italy, which later is intentionally struck by another boat and sinks. After days adrift at sea, Doaa is one of the only survivors to be rescued.

The author is wonderful at telling Doaa's story with a lovely narrative quality about it; I had to remind myself that I wasn't reading a work of fiction, that this was actually someone's real life. Doaa's story is quite sad, even more so because it is real for millions of people. It is for this reason that I echo the idea that Doaa's story should indeed be required reading, especially for anyone that is directly involved with refugees in fields such as politics, education, public policy, and social services.

Recommendation:
Though it is an incredibly sad account, this is one that everyone should truly read.

Thoughts on the cover:
I like how they did the split view of Doaa's face parallel to the title font.

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

The Warden's Daughter - Jerry Spinelli

Title: The Warden's Daughter
Author: Jerry Spinelli
Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf, 2017 (Hardcover)
Length: 341 pages
Genre: Children's Historical Fiction
Started: March 6, 2017
Finished: March 7, 2017

Summary: 
From the inside cover:

"For twelve years the warden had been enough. But now I was sick and tired of being motherless. I wanted one. And if I couldn't have my first-string mother, I'd bring one in off the bench."

Cammie lives with her father, the warden, in an apartment above the entrance to the county jail - so most of the mother figures she's got her eye on are inmates. There's a flamboyant shoplifter named Boo Boo, who dreams of hot fudge sundaes. And a sullen reformed arsonist named Eloda, who works as their housekeeper. Not ideal candidates maybe, but Cammie's nickname isn't Cannonball for nothing. She's a girl who decides what she wants and launches herself at it.

And this summer, Cannonball's fuse is lit and she is set to blow. Her best friend is discovering lipstick and Elvis. The guys she plays baseball with think she plays too rough. A child killer is brought to her prison, and demonstrators are gathering outside her windows. It's the kind if summer when a girl could really use a mom.

In this captivating novel by Jerry Spinelli, Cammie learns that you don't always get what you want. But what you need may be right around the corner.

Summary:
The premise sounded really promising, and after reading an excerpt online, I decided to give this a shot. I've read a few of the author's previous books years ago and was quite impressed, but I have to say this newest one was a bit of a let-down.

Cammie lives in an apartment above the Pennsylvania county prison with her father, the warden. Cammie's mother died in an accident when she was a baby, pushing her out of the way of a moving truck. Years later in 1959 when Cammie is turning thirteen and about to enter junior high school, she realizes she wants a mother-figure, to have that love she's been denied for so long. She hones in on the only female figures available in her environment: inmates. Eloda, a prison trustee (trusted inmate) who acts as their housekeeper, and Boo Boo, an obese black woman who adores Cammie.

The main issue with this book is that Cammie just isn't likeable in my opinion. She's twelve years old, and though I get that she's full of anger and love-starved (the whole theme of Cammie being in a prison of her own just like the inmates), kids know by that age that it doesn't give them the right to be a brat to everyone. The child was literally hell on wheels, which I'd expect from a younger kid, but not at nearly thirteen. If Cammie had been more developed as a character and had a chance to evoke more sympathy from readers, then perhaps I'd feel differently. The adults weren't much better to be honest. Not only does the warden give his daughter the keys to the prison yard so she can go socializing with the female inmates inside the fence (I find it hard to believe any professional in his position would do that), but both the warden and Eloda know that Cammie is angry and wanting attention and love from a female figure and acting out as a result...and in turn they deny her that outright love, watch from the sidelines as she engages in self-destructive behaviour, and then conveniently refuse to discipline her until she "gets it out of her system". I know people didn't believe in therapy in the 50s, but my god, Cammie would need a crap-ton of therapy after those brilliant parenting methods.

There's also the underlying issue of race in the novel, the issue being that it isn't addressed at all. It takes place mainly in the summer of 1959, so a key time period, and in addition to the black kids that Cammie plays with and the other black women in the prison, there's the issue of Boo Boo. She's the stereotype of the big, jolly black woman who has a soft spot for the little white girl. This wouldn't be as glaring of an issue if the characters were explored a bit more so they would be more than just a caricature, but in the absence of proper development, it just leaves me shaking my head. You do eventually get some development regarding Cammie's father and Eloda, but that doesn't happen until the very end of the novel (it's a miracle I even made it that far).

Recommendation:
Pales in comparison to Stargirl, Milkweed, or Manic Magee; so perhaps skip this novel and pick up one of the former instead.

Thoughts on the cover:
I do like the cover, the image of Cammie inside the cage freeing the birds is quite clever.